Exploitation of Remote Services

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Exploitation of Remote Services
Technique
ID T0866
Tactic Lateral Movement
Data Sources Windows error reporting, Process monitoring, File monitoring
Asset Human-Machine Interface, Data Historian, Engineering Workstation

Description

Adversaries may exploit a software vulnerability to take advantage of a programming error in a program, service, or within the operating system software or kernel itself to enable remote service abuse. A common goal for post-compromise exploitation of remote services is for lateral movement to enable access to a remote system.1

ICS asset owners and operators have been affected by ransomware (or disruptive malware masquerading as ransomware) migrating from enterprise IT to ICS environments: WannaCry, NotPetya, and BadRabbit. In each of these cases, self-propagating (“wormable”) malware initially infected IT networks, but through exploit (particularly the SMBv1-targeting MS17-010 vulnerability) spread to industrial networks, producing significant impacts.2


Procedure Examples

  • Bad Rabbit initially infected IT networks, but by means of an exploit (particularly the SMBv1-targeting MS17-010 vulnerability) spread to industrial networks.2
  • NotPetya initially infected IT networks, but by means of an exploit (particularly the SMBv1-targeting MS17-010 vulnerability) spread to industrial networks.2
  • WannaCry initially infected IT networks, but by means of an exploit (particularly the SMBv1-targeting MS17-010 vulnerability) spread to industrial networks.2

Mitigations

  • Application Isolation and Sandboxing - Make it difficult for adversaries to advance their operation through exploitation of undiscovered or unpatched vulnerabilities by using sandboxing. Other types of virtualization and application microsegmentation may also mitigate the impact of some types of exploitation. Risks of additional exploits and weaknesses in these systems may still exist.3
  • Exploit Protection - Security applications that look for behavior used during exploitation such as Windows Defender Exploit Guard (WDEG) and the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) can be used to mitigate some exploitation behavior.4 Control flow integrity checking is another way to potentially identify and stop a software exploit from occurring.5 Many of these protections depend on the architecture and target application binary for compatibility and may not work for all software or services targeted.
  • Network Segmentation - Segment networks and systems appropriately to reduce access to critical system and services communications.
  • Update Software - Update software regularly by employing patch management for internal enterprise endpoints and servers.
  • Vulnerability Scanning - Regularly scan the internal network for available services to identify new and potentially vulnerable services.
  • Threat Intelligence Program - Develop a robust cyber threat intelligence capability to determine what types and levels of threat may use software exploits and 0-days against a particular organization.